Philosophy

The philosophy at Prospect Gymnastics is that building gymnastics skills gives kids important life tools in and out of the gym. We instill confidence in our children by working through physical fears and building new skills. At Prospect Gymnastics we are dedicated to individualized attention and focused training. We achieve this by having small classes, a structured curriculum, positive reinforcement coaching, and top-of-the-line equipment. Our motto is, “Build Skills. Gain Confidence. Have Fun.” We believe that children can grow healthy bodies and boost self-esteem, all while having a blast.

Building Skills

Engaging children in sports is beneficial for their physical and mental well-being. Gymnastics is unique from other forms of exercise because it provides such a wide range of physical training. Gymnastics encompasses flexibility, strength, power, balance, coordination, and aerial awareness. It requires gross and fine motor skills, and develops mental and emotional awareness by improving mental focus.

How do we at Prospect Gymnastics do everything we can to build the ability and skill level of our athletes?

  • In all our classes, we work through a structured curriculum of gymnastics movement and skill progressions that follow USA Gymnastics’ training guidelines.
  • All of our instructors are certified by USA Gymnastics, and are certified in sports safety, first aid & CPR.
  • The studio at Prospect Gymnastics is designed as a children’s gymnastics play space with top-of-the-line equipment, fun skill-building props, and 2-inch foam padding across the entire floor. There are balance beams for coordination, and bars and rings for strength training. Our 15-foot trampoline is a lot of fun to jump on, and is used to learn tumbling skills that are difficult on floor.

Even though myriads of scientific studies reveal that physical activity in children increases brain activity and creativity, we live in an environment where children are kept in their seats for an extended period. In an age when school days are becoming longer, TV is growing increasingly popular, and obesity is on the rise, giving children opportunities to be active has become crucial; taking our city kids out of their cooped up homes and apartments and getting them to move around is vital to their mental and physical development. At Prospect Gymnastics, our children will improve mental, emotional and physical skills through athletic instruction.

Increasing Confidence

At Prospect Gymnastics, we build an athlete’s confidence by using positive reinforcement methods. Our coaches are trained to encourage desired behaviors, thus improving an athlete’s performance. When we coach students in a positive way, they are motivated to try harder on their own. Not only do they build gymnastics skills faster, they also become more motivated and confident individuals.

Having Fun

Most children love gymnastics because it is sport that is fast-paced and diverse – between the bars, balance beams, rings, and trampoline there is something for every child to enjoy. At Prospect Gymnastics we include one fun element in every lesson plan, whether it’s a friendly handstand competition, a Simple Simon Says gymnastics memory game, or the hokey pokey on the balance beam. We recognize that in order to truly use athletic training to achieve physical, emotional, and mental success, our students need to want to be in class. What better way is there to encourage a child to learn than by making learning fun? Through gymnastics-oriented training and games, we teach our athletes that hard work can be both fun and rewarding.

Safety Training

Lastly, gymnastics is unique in that it acts as safety training for our children. Gymnastics skills such as rolls and flips train fast-twitch muscles, improve reflexes, and teach proper body positioning and falling techniques. At Prospect Gymnastics, we have a safety goal in every lesson plan. We constantly review with our athletes how their training in the gym can be translated into safety prevention and response when they’re on the playground or in an emergency situation.

Children develop their fundamental movement skills between the ages of 2 and 5. Toddler physical development is a critical period where children can expand and develop their gross and fine motor capacity for the rest of their lives. Please read the article below to learn more….

Preschool Gymnastics: Creating Healthy Bodies & Healthy Minds

Why put your two-year-old child in a gymnastics program? Why not wait until they are a little older when their bodies and minds are better developed and equipped to learn these difficult skills?

There are scholastic advantages for toddlers who are physically active. Studies show a direct correlation between physical movement and reading readiness. When children run around and play, the physical movements stimulate their brains and help them prepare for studying language. It is crucial that our toddlers get away from the TV screen and start getting active so that they can succeed in school. Gymnastics offers this opportunity and helps toddlers have healthier bodies and minds. It improves toddlers’ physical development during a critical period when toddlers learn to expand and increase their movement capacity and range of motion for the rest of their lives. At Prospect Gymnastics, we start our program at 18 months because children develop their fundamental movement skills between the ages of 2 and 5, and they can benefit from an early start.

According to the CDC, childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. In 2012, more than one-third of children were overweight or obese. One of the main reasons is the decline in children’s physical fitness. On average, children ages 2 to 5 spend about 25 ½ hours per week watching television! Children who are not exposed to physical activity during early school years have a hard time becoming physically active as adults. It is crucial to engage our children in physical fitness at a young age so they can grow up to be healthy adults.

Sources:
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/facts.htm
http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=165
https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/prevention_agenda/physical_activity_and_nutrition/